Those Places Thursday | Stonehenge

0

Today, I was simply awestruck by the shear impossible-ness of Stonehenge. That the stones stand, that they weigh thousands of tonnes and that they came from miles and miles away seems incredible in a somewhat academic way when you read about them, but seeing the huge sarsen stones standing before me, above me, around me, left me speechless.

Stonehenge was constructed about 5000 years ago, for reasons unknown, but many believe that it was a place of worship and a place of ceremony and celebration. Built and rebuilt over the course of about 800 years, Stonehenge is an engineering marvel that would be impressive if it were built today, with today’s tools and equipment but built as it was, with little more than sweat and stone tools, it is beyond incredible.

The craftsmanship in the dove joints between the lintels, and the post and hole joints that help hold the giant lintels atop the towering stones is amazing, even weathered by time and the elements as they are. The stones’ centres are equidistant around a large circle and the sunrise at the summer solstice shines into the heart of the circle. At the winter solstice, visitors can see the sun drop just to one side of the largest remaining stone, if they stand at the entrance to the circle.

A marvel, a mystery, a wonder. Stonehenge is all of that and more.

Barbara J Starmans is a social historian, freelance writer and obsessed genealogist living in Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada and has been doing genealogical research for the past 35 years. She is a graduate of the National Institute for Genealogical Studies in Toronto, Canada with professional learning certificates in General Methodology and in English Records and recently become an instructor for them with an intermediate course on Social History.

Leave A Reply

%d bloggers like this: